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Posts from the ‘Poetry’ Category

“Founded by artist Zata Banks over a decade ago, the PoetryFilm art project continues to play with the avant-garde” – aqnb

PoetryFilm is the influential research art project and screening series founded by Zata Banks FRSA in 2002 to celebrate experimental text/image/sound screening and performance artworks, and to explore semiotics and meaning-making. Since 2002, PoetryFilm has produced over 90 events at cinemas, galleries, literary festivals and academic institutions – including Tate Britain, The ICA, Southbank Centre, Cannes Film Festival, CCCB Barcelona, O Miami, Freud Museum London, and Curzon Cinemas. Lectures include sessions for MA Creative Writing (Warwick University), MA Filmmaking (National Film & Television School), MA Visual Communication (Royal College of Art), and BA Graphic Design (University of Lincoln). Zata Banks has judged poetry film prizes for the Southbank Centre (London), Zebra Festival (Berlin), CYCLOP Video Poetry Festival (Kiev, Ukraine), Apples & Snakes poetry organisation (UK) and Carbon Culture Review art+literature+technology journal (USA).

In 2014, Arts Council England funded the cataloguing of the entire PoetryFilm Archive, which at present contains over 1,000 artworks. In 2015, The British Film Institute awarded funding to curate and produce three PoetryFilm Paradox events for the BFI LOVE season.

PoetryFilm is one of the British Council’s listed Experimental Film organisations, is an accredited member of Film Hub London, part of the BFI Audience Network, and holds a trademark awarded by the Intellectual Property Office.

A great event – one of the most interesting and invigorating I have been to this year!” – Arts Council England.

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Curating the Contemporary: PoetryFilm Paradox

cropped-thumbnail2.jpgCurating the Contemporary* art and culture journal attended the BFI LOVE PoetryFilm Paradox event in December 2015. The poem, Lessons in Love, exploring the paradoxes of love, is a response to the event written by Anna Mace (scroll down and click to read).

*Curating the Contemporary (CtC) is a meeting point for discussion on arts and culture. CtC uses writing as a resource for artists, curators and audiences, sharing diverse perspectives in the format of exhibition reviews, interviews, previews and a series of special features, academic pieces and creative texts. It is a doorway to the contemporary art scene developing in London and beyond. Established in October 2013, CtC is managed by alumni of MA Curating the Contemporary: a course taught in conjunction between the Whitechapel Gallery and London Metropolitan University. It has since then evolved, as an experimental platform, through the collaboration with and discourse of different contributors.

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Spring Psychoanalytic Poetry Festival, The Freud Museum, London, 12 March 2016

Word & Image

Organised by The Freud Museum and The Poetry Society

In talks, readings, conversations and film screenings, speakers from the worlds of poetry, film and psychoanalysis explore the power of images in memory, imagination and poetry. How is an image re-rendered in a poem, and how might perception be influenced by the poet’s internal world?

Sessions include:

Gerry Byrne on the transformational power of words and images in poetry and psychotherapy.

Valerie Sinason on the language of trauma and dissociation. (abstract)

Mark Solms on ‘The Mind of the Artist’. (abstract)

Eliza Kentridge, poet and artist, reading from and introducing Signs for an Exhibition, and in conversation with Mark Solms.

Poetry films selected by Zata Banks and introduced by the filmmakers. (Programme)

Maurice Riordan with a ‘poem on the couch’, conducting an in-depth analysis of a single poem,Santarém by Elizabeth Bishop.

Pascale Petit on how imagery and images filter pain; exploring the creative dialogue she has developed with the work of Frida Kahlo. (abstract)

SPEAKERS

Gerry Byrne is a consultant nurse and child and adolescent psychotherapist, working in the NHS and privately in Oxford. He is clinical lead for the Family Assessment and Safeguarding Service (Oxon, Wilts and BaNES) and the Infant Parent Perinatal Service (Oxon). With two colleagues he runs the annual Children in Troubled Worlds conference which promotes the contributions psychoanalytic thinking and the arts can make to work with troubled children and with Janet Bolam, theatre director and writer, he runs Between the Lines – Writers and Psychotherapists in Conversation. http://www.bolamandbyrne.co.uk

Valerie Sinason is a poet, author, child and adult psychotherapist and adult psychoanalyst. She is Director of the Clinic for Dissociative Studies in London and Honorary Consultant Psychotherapist to the Cape Town Child Guidance Unit.

Mark Solms is Director of Neuropsychology at the University of Cape Town. He is a member of the British, American and South African Psychoanalytical Associations, and has won many awards, including the Sigourney Prize. He has published over 300 articles and six books. He is editor and translator of the forthcoming Revised Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud (24 vols) and the Complete Neuroscientific Works of Sigmund Freud (4 vols).

Eliza Kentridge was born in Johannesburg in 1962. She moved to England in the late 1980s and has lived in Essex for the past 25 years. She is an artist who works in many media, though she is primarily known for her stitched drawings and applique flags. Her literary leanings, evident since childhood, now result in her first book of poetry: Signs For An Exhibition

Maurice Riordan’s poetry collections include The Water Stealer (Faber, 2013) and The Holy Land(Faber, 2007). He has recently edited The Finest Music: Early Irish Lyrics (Faber, 2014). He is Professor of Poetry at Sheffield Hallam University and the editor of The Poetry Review.

Pascale Petit is a poet living in Cornwall. Her sixth collection Fauverie was shortlisted for the 2014 T S Eliot Prize, poems from it won the 2013 Manchester Poetry Prize. Her fifth collection What the Water Gave Me: Poems after Frida Kahlo was shortlisted for both the T S Eliot Prize and Wales Book of the Year, and was a Book of the Year in the Observer. Pascale has had four collections shortlisted for the T S Eliot Prize and chosen as Books of the Year in the Times Literary Supplement, Independent and Observer. She is the recipient of a Cholmondeley Award. Bloodaxe will publish her seventh collection Mama Amazonica in 2017.

PoetryFilm is the highly influential research art project founded by British artist Zata Banks in 2002, celebrating poetry films and other experimental text/image/sound material. Since 2002, PoetryFilm has presented over 80 events at venues including Tate Britain, ICA, FACT Liverpool, Cannes Film Festival, CCCB Barcelona, O Miami, The Royal College of Art, and Curzon Cinemas. Zata Banks has also judged poetry film prizes for the Southbank Centre in London, Zebra Festival in Berlin, and Carbon Culture Review in America. PoetryFilm is supported by Arts Council England, and is an accredited member of Film Hub London, part of the BFI Audience Network. The PoetryFilm Archive, which at present contains over 1,000 artworks, welcomes submissions all year round.

ABSTRACTS/FILM PROGRAMME

Echoes (6 minutes, 35mm)
Artist: Jaimz Asmundson
A process-based, experimental film about loss, and the parallel between memory and the physical self: how it evolves, degrades and disintegrates. Structured around the recollection of a premonitory dream, fragmented memories from the period leading up to the death of the filmmaker’s mother were projected onto natural textures and surfaces, re-photographed, composited and processed until the memories became abstracted representations of the evolution, degradation and disintegration of memory and the physical self.

Echoes

Three Mirrors (20 minutes, 16mm)
Artist: Diana Mavroleon
Shot in the mid-1980s, the film was written using automatic writing to explore the unconscious mind, using mirrors as in-gates. Three Mirrors was made just down the hill from the Freud Museum at Cinema Action in Winchester Rd, and was used for discussion in R.D. Laing’s department of Psychology, in the “Dream Workshop” on Eton Avenue. The film received a ‘Composer’s Commission’ from GLAA, and features an original score by Gary Carpenter.

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You Be Mother (6 minutes, 16mm)
Artist: Sarah Pucill
You Be Mother uses stop-frame animation to disrupt the traditional orders of animate and inanimate, the fluid and the solid. An hallucinatory space is set up when a frozen image of the artist’s face is projected onto weighty pieces of crockery atop a table. Ears, eyes, nose and mouth all become spatially dislocated as a determined hand begins to reposition, decant and mix. Events unfold to the amplified sounds of grinding, pouring and stirring.

You Be Mother.jpg

Palindrome (2 minutes, 8mm)
Artist: Zata Banks
Male and female move towards the centre.

Palindrome

Please share the event information with your networks. Here are the relevant social media links and tags to use:

Poetry and Psychoanalysis
Valerie Sinason
Psychoanalysis and creativity both seek truth and transformation and have a long and complex history. Freud, as a fine writer, brought in both his appreciation of and ambivalence for the poet who, he felt, could delve deeper than the analyst, but not understand what s/he had brought to the surface. He also considered art of any kind could only work if the primary narcissism of the artist was adequately concealed. As a psychoanalyst and poet who loves language Valerie Sinason provides examples of this from her own work as well as that by others and also shows how the literal can sometimes be denigrated in favour of the symbolic

The Mind of the Artist
Mark Solms
Freud famously declared that artists retain their infantile fantasies to an unusual degree. In effect, he argued that they are more narcissistic and less reconciled to reality than non-artists. Does this theory hold water? Psychoanalyst MARK SOLMS will address the question in dialogue with poet and artist ELIZA KENTRIDGE, using her as a sort of ‘case example’.

From Pain to Paint
Pascale Petit
In this presentation I will talk about how images can transform trauma. I will discuss image-making from my own autobiography, illustrating this with poems fromThe Zoo Father and Fauverie, and how the animal imagery filters the pain. I will also show how I have explored trauma through the exuberant but harrowing art of Frida Kahlo, in my collection What the Water Gave Me: Poems after Frida Kahlo, and how working with her images and story allowed me the freedom to explore my own difficult subjects in poems.

Booking

REGISTRATION: £60 Full price / £45 Concessions (£5 reduction for Members of the Freud Musuem and the Poetry Society)

For Online Booking please CLICK HERE

For the Poetry Society website please CLICK HERE

PoetryFilm Paradox at Hackney Picturehouse, Tuesday 22 December 2015, 7pm

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The Terrorist, He Watches – Wislawa Szymborska

The bomb will explode in the bar at twenty past one.
Now it’s only sixteen minutes past.
Some will still have time to enter,
some to leave.

The terrorist’s already on the other side.
That distance protects him from all harm
and well it’s like the pictures:

A woman in a yellow jacket, she enters.
A man in dark glasses, he leaves.
Boys in jeans, they’re talking.
Sixteen minutes past and four seconds.
The smaller one he’s lucky, mounts his scooter,
but the taller chap he walks in.

Seventeen minutes and forty seconds.
A girl, she walks by, a green ribbon in her hair.
But that bus suddenly hides her.
Eighteen minutes past.
The girl’s disappeared.
Was she stupid enough to go in, or wasn’t she.
We shall see when they bring out the bodies.

Nineteen minutes past.
No one else appears to be going in.
On the other hand, a fat bald man leaves.
But seems to search his pockets and
at ten seconds to twenty past one
he returns to look for his wretched gloves.

It’s twenty past one.
Time, how it drags.
Surely, it’s now.
No, not quite.
Yes, now.
The bomb, it explodes.

Taken from “Sounds Feelings Thoughts: Seventy Poems” by Wislawa Szymborska, trans. Adam Czermiawski

Cannes Lions 2015: Scientists vs. Poets

SCIENTISTS VS. POETS – THE ART OF CONNECTING DATA TO STORYTELLING

Traditionally the artistic left-brain indulgences have been diametrically opposed to the analytical right-brain disciplines. However, in today’s hyper-connected world, the best marketing comes when you embrace the creative tension between left-brain and right-brain. Powerful storytelling will always be the best way to motivate people’s behaviour, but data and analytics can help brands get under the skin of that behaviour. DigitasLBi Chief Creative Officer, Chris Clarke, and Chief Data Scientist, Jason Kodish, will battle it out on-stage before using real data gleaned from the audience to create compelling “stories” in real-time. Using these practical examples they will demonstrate that the best, most compelling narratives come from a combination of data and storytelling. They will prove once and for all that the scientists and the poets should join forces.

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“Pure Tongue” exhibition exploring language, 19 June – 20 August 2015

The Pure Tongue exhibition opens today at Galeria Arsenał and runs until 20 August 2016. Artists in the show include Piotr Bosacki and Érik Bullot, whose artworks have previously been shown at PoetryFilm events. Information taken from the gallery’s website is below.

From 19 June 2015 to 20 August 2015
Opening: 18:00
Curator: Agata Chinowska
Place: Galeria Arsenał, ul. A. Mickiewicza 2, Białystok
Artists: Ad manum (Anna Koźbiel / Adam Walas), Piotr Bosacki, Érik Bullot, Ex-artists’ collective (Anikó Loránt / Tamás Kaszás), Ferenc Gróf, Little Warsaw, Małgorzata Niedzielko, Paulina Ołowska, Daniel Salomon, Slavs and Tatars, Société Réaliste

The point of departure for the Pure Tongue exhibition is Ludwik Zamenhof’s thought and his concept of a neutral platform of communication which would lead to cultural and ethnic divisions being overcome. His experience first from multilingual Białystok, then from multicultural Warsaw and, most of all, the situation of the Jewish diaspora motivated him to develop new social ideas whose final result was a universal international language. The first idea Zamenhof formed was Hillelism, involving reduction of social and mental differences between Jews and other European societies. Zamenhof believed that it took a universal language for the Jewish nation to peacefully coexist with others. As he worked on, Zamenhof’s premises became more general, now relating to all people, and the modified concept was termed Homaranismo. Agnieszka Jagodzińska wrote: “Zamenhof went down the road from Jewish particularism to all-encompassing universalism”[1]. Even though Zamenhof is best known as the originator of Esperanto, his ideas reached far beyond the linguistic field, including social, political and religious matters. First and foremost, Zamenhof was the precursor of multiculturalism and he wanted Esperanto to be not only a tool of communication but also a platform facilitating better understanding among nations and, as a consequence, effecting changes in social relations.

The main idea behind numerous attempts at developing a universal (perfect) language was to create a unification tool. The search for a perfect language encouraged a desire to return to a primal (pure) language. This was also the intention of Ludwik Zamenhof – to develop a “pure tongue” (Heb. safa berura) that would create harmony between nations. Walter Benjamin intuitively steered his reflections on translation towards the search for a perfect tongue. In his essay “The Task of the Translator”, he wrote: “Rather, all suprahistorical kinship of languages rests in the intention underlying each language as a  whole – an intention, however, which no single language can attain by itself but which is realized only by the totality of their intentions supplementing each other: pure language.”[2]

One of the main themes of the Pure Tongue exhibition is the myth of the Tower of Babel. The confusion of languages (L. confusio linguarum) that is found in it is regarded as punishment. Therefore, an important point of reference within the context of this exhibition is the reversal of the significance of the myth discussed by Umberto Eco in his book entitledThe Search for the Perfect Language. Eco cites theories suggesting that confusion – synonymous with multiplication or diversity – may be interpreted as a positive phenomenon, whose effects can be, for instance, observed in the development of ethnic bonds and territorial status. This view casts a new light on a wide range of questions pertaining to the politics of language, such as, for instance, the national language versus minority languages, marginalization of minority languages, language as an expression of ethnic identity, determination of one universal language in view of multiculturalism and multiethnicity. These problems seem most topical in an era of European integration. The European Union has decided that official languages of the community are the languages of all the member states. This was done to avoid conflict which would surely arise from introducing an official language that would at once be the language of one of the members (possibly English). It seems likely, however, that further expansion of the UE – and the resulting increase in the number of official languages of the community, will force the Union to choose one international auxiliary language.

The question of an artificial language is also related to the politics of language; developing new languages or eliminating them is also part of this politics. Naturally, politics can transform language to serve its purposes. It is enough to remember totalitarian systems, including e.g. Fascism or Stalinism, whose interference in language was very forceful. Language has always been with those in power. Also, the choice of alphabet, the visual recording of language, was a political and cultural decision, e.g. the choice of the Latin alphabet suggested belonging to a specific cultural region. This led to several linguistic revolutions, as, for instance, Latinization of the Ottoman Turkish language implemented by Mustafa Kemal Atatürk in Turkey in 1928 or failed attempts to Cyrillicize Polish language in Polish territories under Russian rule in the middle of the 19th century.

The Sapir-Whorf hypothesis states that human thought is determined by language and, as a result, it is language that conditions our perception of the world and state of mind. The thesis that “thinking and language is the same” means that language – to some extent – contains an image of the world. In the light of this concept, changes occurring in language as a consequence of globalization and communication networks (blogs, social services, internet communicators, mobile applications, etc) and related iconography (e.g. emoticons) seem very inspiring. The dominant language here is English – in the state of constant revolution, adopting it to never-ending changes in the grammar of electronic communication.

To sum up, the Pure Tongue exhibition centers on the question of universal communication; it explores the reasons for the desire to achieve it, the motivations behind creating artificial tools of communication in its various forms, including language, alphabet, lettering, or codes, e.g. the Morse code. Inspired by Ludwik Zamenhof’s ideas, it analyses his concepts within the context of current phenomena, both linguistic as well as political or national ones.

Agata Chinowska

translated by Monika Ujma

[1] Agnieszka Jagodzińska, Ludwik Zamenhof wobec kwestii żydowskiej, Kraków – Budapeszt 2012.

[2]Walter Benjamin, The Task of the Translator [first printed as introduction to a Baudelaire translation, 1923], in Illuminations, trans. Harry Zohn; ed. & intro. Hannah Arendt (NY: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich 1968), pp. 69-82.