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Posts tagged ‘language’

“Pure Tongue” exhibition exploring language, 19 June – 20 August 2015

The Pure Tongue exhibition opens today at Galeria Arsenał and runs until 20 August 2016. Artists in the show include Piotr Bosacki and Érik Bullot, whose artworks have previously been shown at PoetryFilm events. Information taken from the gallery’s website is below.

From 19 June 2015 to 20 August 2015
Opening: 18:00
Curator: Agata Chinowska
Place: Galeria Arsenał, ul. A. Mickiewicza 2, Białystok
Artists: Ad manum (Anna Koźbiel / Adam Walas), Piotr Bosacki, Érik Bullot, Ex-artists’ collective (Anikó Loránt / Tamás Kaszás), Ferenc Gróf, Little Warsaw, Małgorzata Niedzielko, Paulina Ołowska, Daniel Salomon, Slavs and Tatars, Société Réaliste

The point of departure for the Pure Tongue exhibition is Ludwik Zamenhof’s thought and his concept of a neutral platform of communication which would lead to cultural and ethnic divisions being overcome. His experience first from multilingual Białystok, then from multicultural Warsaw and, most of all, the situation of the Jewish diaspora motivated him to develop new social ideas whose final result was a universal international language. The first idea Zamenhof formed was Hillelism, involving reduction of social and mental differences between Jews and other European societies. Zamenhof believed that it took a universal language for the Jewish nation to peacefully coexist with others. As he worked on, Zamenhof’s premises became more general, now relating to all people, and the modified concept was termed Homaranismo. Agnieszka Jagodzińska wrote: “Zamenhof went down the road from Jewish particularism to all-encompassing universalism”[1]. Even though Zamenhof is best known as the originator of Esperanto, his ideas reached far beyond the linguistic field, including social, political and religious matters. First and foremost, Zamenhof was the precursor of multiculturalism and he wanted Esperanto to be not only a tool of communication but also a platform facilitating better understanding among nations and, as a consequence, effecting changes in social relations.

The main idea behind numerous attempts at developing a universal (perfect) language was to create a unification tool. The search for a perfect language encouraged a desire to return to a primal (pure) language. This was also the intention of Ludwik Zamenhof – to develop a “pure tongue” (Heb. safa berura) that would create harmony between nations. Walter Benjamin intuitively steered his reflections on translation towards the search for a perfect tongue. In his essay “The Task of the Translator”, he wrote: “Rather, all suprahistorical kinship of languages rests in the intention underlying each language as a  whole – an intention, however, which no single language can attain by itself but which is realized only by the totality of their intentions supplementing each other: pure language.”[2]

One of the main themes of the Pure Tongue exhibition is the myth of the Tower of Babel. The confusion of languages (L. confusio linguarum) that is found in it is regarded as punishment. Therefore, an important point of reference within the context of this exhibition is the reversal of the significance of the myth discussed by Umberto Eco in his book entitledThe Search for the Perfect Language. Eco cites theories suggesting that confusion – synonymous with multiplication or diversity – may be interpreted as a positive phenomenon, whose effects can be, for instance, observed in the development of ethnic bonds and territorial status. This view casts a new light on a wide range of questions pertaining to the politics of language, such as, for instance, the national language versus minority languages, marginalization of minority languages, language as an expression of ethnic identity, determination of one universal language in view of multiculturalism and multiethnicity. These problems seem most topical in an era of European integration. The European Union has decided that official languages of the community are the languages of all the member states. This was done to avoid conflict which would surely arise from introducing an official language that would at once be the language of one of the members (possibly English). It seems likely, however, that further expansion of the UE – and the resulting increase in the number of official languages of the community, will force the Union to choose one international auxiliary language.

The question of an artificial language is also related to the politics of language; developing new languages or eliminating them is also part of this politics. Naturally, politics can transform language to serve its purposes. It is enough to remember totalitarian systems, including e.g. Fascism or Stalinism, whose interference in language was very forceful. Language has always been with those in power. Also, the choice of alphabet, the visual recording of language, was a political and cultural decision, e.g. the choice of the Latin alphabet suggested belonging to a specific cultural region. This led to several linguistic revolutions, as, for instance, Latinization of the Ottoman Turkish language implemented by Mustafa Kemal Atatürk in Turkey in 1928 or failed attempts to Cyrillicize Polish language in Polish territories under Russian rule in the middle of the 19th century.

The Sapir-Whorf hypothesis states that human thought is determined by language and, as a result, it is language that conditions our perception of the world and state of mind. The thesis that “thinking and language is the same” means that language – to some extent – contains an image of the world. In the light of this concept, changes occurring in language as a consequence of globalization and communication networks (blogs, social services, internet communicators, mobile applications, etc) and related iconography (e.g. emoticons) seem very inspiring. The dominant language here is English – in the state of constant revolution, adopting it to never-ending changes in the grammar of electronic communication.

To sum up, the Pure Tongue exhibition centers on the question of universal communication; it explores the reasons for the desire to achieve it, the motivations behind creating artificial tools of communication in its various forms, including language, alphabet, lettering, or codes, e.g. the Morse code. Inspired by Ludwik Zamenhof’s ideas, it analyses his concepts within the context of current phenomena, both linguistic as well as political or national ones.

Agata Chinowska

translated by Monika Ujma

[1] Agnieszka Jagodzińska, Ludwik Zamenhof wobec kwestii żydowskiej, Kraków – Budapeszt 2012.

[2]Walter Benjamin, The Task of the Translator [first printed as introduction to a Baudelaire translation, 1923], in Illuminations, trans. Harry Zohn; ed. & intro. Hannah Arendt (NY: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich 1968), pp. 69-82.

 

There is “no signal” in the Empire of Signs: Roland Barthes and Poetry

no signal

Roland Barthes and Poetry

Last week I was at The University of Leeds presenting a paper called The PoetryFilm Archive 2002-2015 at the AHRC’s Pararchive conference. Whilst in Leeds, I was invited to another conference, also taking place at the university campus, on the topic of Roland Barthes and Poetry. I was able to attend one of the sessions and I heard two very interesting papers about Barthes and Mourning (Neil Badmington), and about Barthes and Haiku (Marcio Renato Pinheiro da Silva), followed by a stimulating discussion. The above photograph was taken during a technical moment and was coincidentally appropriate in the context of Barthes. Copy from the press release is below*.

*The purpose of this conference marking the centenary of the birth of the French literary critic Roland Barthes is to consider a theme in his writing and his subsequent influence that is not normally highlighted, but which could be considered, paradoxically, to be central to his oeuvre. Very little of Barthes’s literary criticism nor his own reading habits generally are, ostensibly, concerned with poets or poetry; and yet his very first book-length essay, on the degree zero of writing (1953), attempts, in one chapter, a definition of ‘poetic writing’.

Indeed, Barthes’s university specialism at the Sorbonne, in the late 1930s, was in Ancient Greek incantations, his reading diet at the time being Michaux, Valéry, Baudelaire and Whitman. Later he worked closely for periods of time with a number of important French post-war poets (Jean Cayrol, Francis Ponge, Marcelin Pleynet), and with the Moroccan poets Abdelkébir Khatibi and Zaghloul Morsy. More widely, Barthes’s writing is peppered with references to the ‘poetic’, from ‘Myth, today’, through an analysis of the Encyclopedia, the bodily pleasures of poetry (rhythm, sound, performance), the erotics of the text rather than a hermeneutics, to his writing on Haïku.

This conference sets out to complement others taking place in the UK next year (at Cardiff and at the British Academy), by focussing on poetics as a general theory of communication and of human signifying practices in and beyond language as a central Barthesian concern, be it in the work of the Hellenist George Thomson, or the poetic theory of Roman Jakobson. Indeed, poetry – especially in the work of German Romantics, and in the Romantic ‘Lieder’ too – becomes a crucial support for Barthes in the last years of his life following the death of his mother.

Poetry and poetics, the conference hopes to suggest then, are so important in Barthes’s theories and writing that we could even see a Pan-poetics in his work, so fundamental that it is not usually named as such. One of the main aims of the conference is therefore to suggest the place of poetry in Barthes’s work. A second aim of the conference is to look at the ways in which poets have responded to Barthesian poetic theory, especially in the case of American avant-garde poetry of the 1950s-1970s. Here the influence is marked, especially in the L-A-N-G-U-A-G-E grouping based in San Francisco, but it can also be traced in the ‘Sound poetry’ revolution of the 1950s and 1960s.

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Transmutations: PoetryFilm / Alchemy Film & Moving Image Festival, 16-19 April 2015

Alchemy Logo

Alchemy Film and Moving Image Festival and Zata Banks from PoetryFilm have co-curated this special screening, mixing films from Alchemy open submissions with classics. It features a diverse selection of film artworks, chosen for their alignment with poetry, with poetic structures, with poetic experiences, and with the visual, verbal and aural languages of poetry in various forms. The 45 minute screening will be followed by a 15 minute Q&A with some of the filmmakers, including Richard Bailey (USA) and Sean Martin (UK).

The Alchemy Film & Moving Image Festival will take place 16-19 April 2015 in Hawick, Scotland, UK.

Full programme details are below.

About PoetryFilm:

PoetryFilm is a research art project founded by Zata Banks in 2002, celebrating and exploring poetry films and other text/image/sound material. Since 2002, PoetryFilm has presented over 60 events at venues including Tate Britain, The ICA, FACT Liverpool, Cannes Film Festival, CCCB Barcelona, O Miami, The Royal College of Art, Curzon Cinemas. Zata has judged poetry film prizes for the Southbank Centre, Zebra Festival in Berlin, Carbon Culture Review in America, and Apples & Snakes in the UK. PoetryFilm is supported by Arts Council England, and is an accredited member of Film Hub London, part of the BFI Audience Network. The PoetryFilm Archive welcomes submissions all year round.

Transmutations

Venue: Tower Mill, Heart of Hawick
Tickets: £4
Screening date: Fri 17 April
Screening time: 5.10pm

All films in this programme (ordered alphabetically by title):

AFTERLIGHT

Timothy David Orme /United States/2013/00:03:00/

Afterlight is a short hand made film that explores both one’s inherent darkness and one’s inherent lightness. Every frame was made with charcoal on paper (sometimes each frame was drawn up to eight times) and then composited digitally.

Biography/Filmography:

Timothy David Orme is a writer, filmmaker, and animator. His two books of poems, Catalogue of Burnt Text, and his second book, Oponearth, are available through BlazeVOX Books. His films have won international awards and shown at film festivals all over the world They are available (when possible) right here on this website. Tim has also worked in television as both a camera operator, writer, director, animator, and public service announcement producer.

http://www.timothydavidorme.com/Afterlight


DREAM POEM

Dann Casswell /United Kingdom/2005/00:01:30/

In dreams it’s impossible to read the same thing twice and not have it change on you. In 2006 I made this poem from the perspective of someone who is having a fitful night’s sleep and is worried about their relationship, about loneliness, about death. The film was once played for the Sultan of Brunei, whose daughter is dyslexic. He actually sent me a sword to say thank you. It was all very strange. I still love it dearly, so I hope you enjoy it as much as the Sultan did. Please don’t send me any more swords.

Biography/Filmography:

Since creating Dream Poem in 2006, Dann Casswell has worked full-time for the BBC on local radio, for BBC Children in Need and organising creative BBC Outreach projects in his home town of Bristol. He has had work published in various short story outlets and has had work commissioned by BBC Radio 4. Dann is now a director of CreativeConnection.co.uk where he works running the animation channel, writing, producing and directing beautiful short films and high-end communications for corporate and charity clients.

https://poetryfilm.org/2014/08/19/poetryfilm-archive-dream-poem-by-dann-casswell/


EVERYTHING MAKES LOVE WITH THE SILENCE

Hernan Talavera, 3 poems by Alejandra Pizarnik/Spain/2013/00:02:34/

Biography/Filmography:

Hernán Talavera has a degree in Fine Arts. He experiments with the visual and poetic possibilities of the environment in search of dreams and intimate images. During his training he studied with artists including Tony Conrad, Carsten Nicolai (Alva Noto), José Luis Guerin, Llorenç Barber and Antonio López. His work has been recognised with awards including the prize for the best piece of video art (Rendibú), the Plató Digital Award (Abycine) or the Special Jury Prize for Best Screenplay (Independent and Fantastic Film, Toledo). His work has been exhibited at events including the Athens International Video Art Festival (Greece), the Internationales Videofestival Bochum (Germany), the Mostra Internazionale del Cortometraggio Montecatini (Italy) and The International Drawing Project in Kulturmodell Bräugasse of Passau (Germany). He also participates in the Daniel Charles Orchestra conducted by Llorenç Barber, in various concerts dedicated to John Cage, including those conducted in October Contemporary Culture Center Valencia (OCCC), the Valencian Museum of the Enlightenment and Modernity (MUVIM ) and the Contemporary Art Space of Castelló (EACC).

http://www.hernantalavera.com/


FAUSTUS: INCIDENT #375

Dominik Pagacz/Canada/2013/00:01:44/United Kingdom premiere

Mephistopheles enlightens Faustus.

Biography/Filmography:

Dominik Pagacz, a Canadian multidisciplinary artist whose body of film work spans over two decades, is the founding member and Artistic Director of Segment 3, an experimental theatre and film production company based in Montreal, Canada.

Filmography:

2014: Quand il vous regarde, Mercitronc!,  All the king’s horses

2013: Segment 3, 3hams, Avec leur tact habituel, 3orthographies, Like molten lead, Their simple needs, A hole in the desert, To sleep, Rawdon, Faustus: incident #375, goodboy, Arabstrap, Sir, replies Monsieur, 3rôles.

http://www.segment3.com/


FLOATERS IN THE EYE

Antoinette Zwirchmayr/Germany/2011/00:03:00/

Scattered points of light flash out from the darkness of the projection, like small forks of lightning, in a continually throbbing succession, and obviously following a systematic pattern, then two hands – the right hand is sewing together each finger of the left hand, the needle penetrates the upper layer of the skin, pulls the thread through, cautiously but smartly, as if there were no pain to be felt. For her film floaters in the eye, Antoinette Zwirchmayr transferred the poem Schliere by Paul Celan in Braille onto an already exposed 16mm film.

Biography/Filmography:

From 2011: Academy of fine Arts – Video and Videoinstallation / Dorit Margreiter
2014 Lecture at Friedl Kubelka School
2014 Assistant Paolo Woods, Summeracademy of fine Arts Salzburg
2010/11 School for Independent Film / Friedl Kubelka (tutor a.o.: Robert Beavers, Peter Tscherkassky, P. Adams Sitney, Nathaniel Dorsky, Ute Aurand)
2009/10 School for Artistic Photography / Friedl Kubelka (tutor a.o.: Victor Burgin, Lisl Ponger)
From 2009: Studies of Romanian Philology, Universitiy of Vienna
2009 International Summeracademy of fine Arts Salzburg/ Ines Doujak
2008/09 School for Photography Vienna

http://www.antoinettezwirchmayr.com/


KISSING IN HATS /

Stuart Pound and Rosemary Norman /United Kingdom/2013/00:01:30/

The poem Kissing in Hats is a villanelle, a verse form where the regular repetition of two key lines gives added urgency to what is being said. In the video, this effect is intensified by multiple tracking of the speaker’s voice, and a moving path scans a set of four drawings of World War Two lovers, kissing in hats before the men must board their train.

Biography/Filmography:

Stuart Pound lives in London and has worked in film, digital video, sound and the visual arts since the early 1970s. Since 1995 he has collaborated with the poet Rosemary Norman. Work has been screened regularly at international film and video festivals.

http://www.stuartpound.info


KOAN II

Sean Martin/Scotland/2014/00:03:00/World premiere

An ongoing series of meditations on the ontology of the image, derived from the tradition of the paradoxical riddle in Zen that is designed to awaken the student.

Biography/Filmography:

Sean Martin is a writer and filmmaker based in Edinburgh. His books include Andrei Tarkovsky and New Waves in Cinema, in addition to works on mediaeval history. He is also a poet, and won the 2011 Wigtown Poetry Prize.
Films include:
Mystery Play (2001 – feature)
The Notebooks of Cornelius Crow (2005 – feature)
Super-8 Cities (2007 (collaborative feature documentary)
Lanterna Magicka: Bill Douglas & the Secret History of Cinema (2009 – feature documentary)
A Boat Retold (2011 – short documentary)
Folie à Deux (2012 – feature)
Koan (2012 – short)

http://www.vimeo.com/lanternamagickafilms


LETTER

Eduardo Kac/United States/1996/00:01:00/

A navigational poem that presents the viewer with the image of a three-dimensional spiral jetting off the center of a two-dimensional spiral. Both spirals are made exclusively of text. The reader is able to grab and spin this cosmic verbal image in all directions. Thus, reading becomes a process of probing the virtual object from all possible angles. The reader is also able to fly through and around the object, thus expanding reading possibilities. In “Letter” a spiraling cone made of words can be interpreted as both converging to or diverging from the flat one. Together they may evoke the creation or destruction of a star. All texts are created as if they were fragments of letters written to the same person. However, in order to convey a particular emotional sphere, the author conflated the subject positions of grandmother, mother, and daughter into one addressee. It is not possible to distinguish to whom each fragment is addressed. The poem makes reference to moments of death and birth in the poet’s family. Letter is presented here as video documentation of an interactive reading experience.

Biography/Filmography:

Eduardo Kac is internationally recognized for his telepresence and bio art. A pioneer of telecommunications art in the pre-Web ’80s, Eduardo Kac (pronounced “Katz”) emerged in the early ’90s with his radical works combining telerobotics and living organisms. His visionary integration of robotics, biology and networking explores the fluidity of subject positions in the post-digital world. His work deals with issues that range from the mythopoetics of online experience (Uirapuru) to the cultural impact of biotechnology (Genesis); from the changing condition of memory in the digital age (Time Capsule) to distributed collective agency (Teleporting an Unknown State); from the problematic notion of the “exotic” (Rara Avis) to the creation of life and evolution (GFP Bunny).

http://www.ekac.org/


LUNAR ALMANAC

Malena Szlam /Canada/2014/00:04:00/

Malena Szlam creates an artisanal journey through magnetic spheres with a staccato layering of single-frame long exposures of a multiplied moon.

Biography/Filmography:

Originally from Chile, Malena Szlam Salazar lives and works in Montreal. A member of the Double Negative Collective, she is a visual artist whose practice is situated at the intersection between cinema and installation art. Her work has been presented at the Festival du nouveau cinema, Images Festival, the NYFF’s Views from the Avant-Garde and the Ann Arbor Film Festival, among others. Her films include: Chronogram of Inexistent Time (2008, instal), Beneath Your Skin of Deep Hollow (2010, short doc), Javi (2011, short), Lunar Almanac (2014, short)


OTHER WOUNDS

Richard Bailey/United States/2013/00:08:27/European premiere

OTHER WOUNDS features three secular homilies on the wonder of childhood perceptions, the strange landscape of life everlasting, and the violence of being human. The video celebrates the wild place that lies between object and symbol, between the concrete particularity of material phenomena and the abstract generality of pure thought. There is a sense of play and reverence in the way the narrator adds mythic emphasis to the sensible features of landscape and architecture in the pictures.

Biography/Filmography:

Richard Bailey’s short films have shown in festivals across the country, including SXSW, Focus, Black Maria, Snake Alley and at Anthology Film Archives in NYC. His poetry collection REVIVAL was awarded Finalist for the 2012 Emily Dickinson First Book Award. He was nominated for a Pushcart Prize for a short story. His play A SHIP OF HUMAN SKIN was a Semifinalist at The Bay Area Playwrights Festival, 2012 and The Eugene O’Neill Theater Center’s National Playwrights Conference, 2012.

http://tropicpictures.com


ROLLING FRAMES

Katie Garrett (film), Ella Jane Chappell (poem)/United Kingdom/2014/00:03:00/

The winning poetry film for adults in the Southbank Centre’s “Shot Through The Heart” poetry film competition.

Rolling Frames is an intimate and personal look into the scenarios of three very different relationships that are affected and manipulated by dependency. At the heart of Rolling Frames are a series of shifting voices and characters that inhabit three very different relationships. These relationships are linked by the role that dependency plays in each. To some extent, every relationship involves a yielding of independence. The poem dissects this manner of yielding: the manifestation of greed in desire, the vulnerability in love, the loneliness in lust. The physicality and inner rhythms of the words are translated once over by the expressive movements of dance, and once again through the gaze of the camera’s eyes

Biography/Filmography:

Collaborators include choreography by Anna-Lise Marie Hearn, videography by Katie Garrett (Garrett & Garrett Videography) and poetry by Ella Jane Chappell. With voices by Katie Garrett and Nicholas Hermann.

http://www.anico-dance.com/intro-1-2/


THE SOUND OF BREATHING

Erin Celeste Weisgerber/Canada/2012/00:05:46/United Kingdom premiere

Engage in the ancient practice
Of patching together
Moving and bending with ease

The cinematic translation of a poem, The Sound of Breathing is part dance film, part cine-poem. Shot and edited on 16mm black and white sotck, the film is re-photographed on an optical printer and crudely hand-processed in buckets. The resulting images present a tension between representational depth and film surface.

Biography/Filmography:

Erin Weisgerber is an emerging Montreal-based filmmaker and a graduate of the Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema where she received the Faculty of Fine Art`s 2014 ¨Cinema Prize¨ as the ¨most outstanding graduate of the Department of Cinema.¨ Her educational background in philosophy and English literature influence her approach to filmmaking. Along with creating individual analog film works, Weisgerber also contributes to documentary and narrative films as a director of photography and camera operator. She is a member of Montreal`s Double Negative Collective. Her films have played in Canada, France, Britain, the United States, and Lebanon.


V.

Bernard Roddy/United States/2013/00:02:40/

V.

V. received its soundtrack from an accomplished electroacoustic musician, Konstantinos Karathanasis. The film was shot as visual percussion and could be left silent. The idea of flicker has been adapted here for shooting cover art from paperback novels of my youth and “keeping time” to the rhythm of the graphics. V. exploits the personal significance of particular paperback titles I remember owning.

Biography/Filmography:

My work in film from 2009 through 2013 has focused on the body in performance and the poetics of page and speech. Whereas the former organise actions within sequences, the latter investigate the lyrical and textual.

http://tactilecorpus.com

PoetryFilm / Alchemy Film & Moving Image Festival, 16-19 April 2015

Alchemy Logo

 

 

 

 

 

I am delighted to announce that the Alchemy Film & Moving Image Festival has partnered with PoetryFilm to co-curate a special screening event as part of the 2015 Festival, featuring a diverse selection of film artworks, chosen for their alignment with poetry, with poetic structures, with poetic experiences, and with the visual, verbal and aural languages of poetry in various forms. The 45 minute screening will be followed by a 15 minute Q&A with some of the filmmakers, chaired by Zata Kitowski.

The Alchemy Film & Moving Image Festival will take place 16-19 April 2015 in Hawick, Scotland, UK.

Full programme details will be released shortly.

PoetryFilm in Athens, 24-26 April 2015

I am delighted to announce that PoetryFilm will be contributing a special programme of poetry films focusing on the body and gender/identity to the sound acts event in Athens in April 2015.

sound acts

 

A gathering, festival and symposium of sound artists and academics that work around notions of performance and identity is happening in Athens on the 24, 25, 26 of April. The event will host a wide series of performances, lectures and workshops from practitioners working in Greece, Europe and America, in most cases presenting new work.

The central body of the event revolves around FYTINI, Greece’s first queer music label, which emerged out of a series of happenings organised by conceptual art duo FYTA at the Athens Biennale 2013. Since its creation, the label has developed relationships and presented work in Europe, with most important point of reference LCC’s sound:gen- der:feminism:activism conference, the biggest international event of this kind.

sound acts will be the first such event in Greece, introducing the athenian audience to work not frequently seen and hopefully opening a dialogue about gender and identity politics within sound production.

With: Alex C (GR), Andriana Minou presents ‘Epicycle’ by Jani Christou (UK/GR), Caoimhe Mader McGuinness (UK/FR), DoDo (DE/GR), Erica Scourti (UK/GR), Frantic Aerostat (GR), FYΤA (GR), Holly Ingleton (UK), Les Trucs (DE/FR), Georges Jacotey (GR), INVASORIX (MX), Kostis Stafylakis (GR), Maria Dolores & Hundin Atxe (ES), Nanah Palm (UK/GR), Peter Cant (UK), Alexandros Drosos & Ioanna Forti (GR), Procne & Philomela (GR), Sex Workers Opera (UK/FR), Tante & Tante (UK/DE), Tara Rodgers (US), Zata Kitowski (UK)

All events will be free for the audience, adhering to the label’s DIY ethos and politics of inclusion. sound acts is also free of sponsoring, being funded solely by the label and artists themselves, with the help of crowd–funding.

The ultimate aim is the creation of a creative community, as well as a new counter-audience.

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PoetryFilm is featured in the Oxford Handbook of Contemporary British and Irish Poetry

“Recent signs of poetic cine-literacy include Zata Kitowski’s PoetryFilm nights”

My PoetryFilm work is mentioned in the Oxford Handbook of Contemporary British and Irish Poetry (ed. Peter Robinson). Thanks to Sophie Mayer.

Oxford Handbook

Event Report, University of Liverpool (review of the Send & Receive symposium)

Below is a review of the Send & Receive: Poetry, Film & Technology in the 21st Century symposium, written by PhD student Ashwaq Basnawifor for The University of Liverpool’s Centre for New and International Writing website*.

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